Stockland paves the way for sustainability with recycled road

Published 11:00am 11 August 2022

Stockland paves the way for sustainability with recycled road
Words by Ashleigh Howarth
Above: Shadforths Construction Manager Darrin Dodunski, Stockland Senior Project Manager Danny Allen and Stockland Development Manager Jacob Hunter. 

Tonnes of plastic bags, glass bottles, toner from used print cartridges, reclaimed asphalt and rubber from old tyres have been recycled to create a new 3.9km stretch of road that is currently under construction on the Redcliffe peninsula.

The new Reconophalt surfaced roadway, which is made up of materials that might have otherwise ended up in landfill or stockpiled, is part of Stockland’s Newport community.

Stockland Senior Development Manager Blair Britton says the use of Reconophalt at Newport reinforces Stockland’s commitment to using sustainable materials at its masterplanned communities.

“We’re proud to pave the way with this initiative – Newport will be the first of our Queensland communities to use recycled asphalt,” Blair says.

“Our sustainability approach to masterplanned communities focuses on our opportunity to deliver shared value for residents and councils alike.”

Compared to traditional asphalt, Reconophalt will result in an increase in asset life and performance, a 30 per cent carbon emission reduction, and a cost neutral outcome based on whole of life.

Blair estimates the Newport community will divert more than 1.9 million plastic bags, 57,900 printer cartridges, 254,000 glass bottles and 822 tonnes of recycled asphalt from landfill – saving the equivalent of 19 tonnes of carbon dioxide or the equivalent of removing 14.6 cars from the road annually.

See the gallery below.

How the materials were collected

Materials that are included in the Reconophalt surfaced roadway have been collected from several collection points.

Much of the plastic was collected from bins located at Coles and Woolworths supermarkets, which allowed customers to deposit their soft plastics and plastic bags.

“We hope residents who recycle their soft plastics at their supermarket, or put glass in their recycle bin, can feel proud that their actions help make roads like this possible,” Blair says.

In addition, the waste toner came from used printer cartridges that were collected under Planet Ark’s cartridge recycling scheme, the rubber crumbs were collected from old tyres, the asphalt came from old roads and the glass was diverted from landfill.

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