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Island warning for motorists and boaties

Posted: 9am 15 Dec 2020

Part of Bribie Island has been closed to traffic and boaties are to avoid the area after waves broke through a dune effectively dividing the island in two.

The section is on the northern tip, towards Caloundra, where there has been a long history of natural erosion. But this is the first time waves have broken the dune.

It has been caused by unusually high tides and large waves which were part of the weather system currently affecting Queensland and New South Wales.

Safety first

Queensland Department of Environment and Science said there are no planned “remedial actions” for the affected area of Bribie Island.

However, Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) will make a site assessment as soon as it is safe to do so, and “implement any actions required to ensure visitor safety”.

This section of Bribie Island is currently closed to vehicle traffic. Boaties are advised to stay away from the area.

The Department of Environment and Science says it is working with Sunshine Coast Regional Council over the management of erosion and tidal breakthrough.

The entrance to Pumicestone Passage used to be 700 metres south of where it is – right about at the point of this breakthrough. Bribie at this breakthrough point used to be 80m wide.

Workload easing

Moreton Bay SES Unit acting Controller Alan Peterson says crews are still responding to about six jobs, but things have settled down in the wake of yesterday’s wild weather.

Mr Peterson says the emergency started to ease from early afternoon, but a thunderstorm last night forced them to stop work due to safety concerns.

He does not anticipate too many issues today, despite this morning’s high tide, saying most people who needed to fortify their properties with sandbags did that yesterday.

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