New mobile cameras to catch speeding motorists

Published 5:00am 8 September 2022

New mobile cameras to catch speeding motorists
Words by Nick Crockford

New speed camera technology will be rolled out tomorrow targeting drivers in school zones and roadworks.

In a world-first safety initiative, the specially-designed mobile cameras will “pop-up in high-risk locations” across Moreton Bay Region and Queensland.

The cameras, commissioned by Transport and Main Roads (TMR), vary - solar-powered roadworks cameras will be a mobile platform so they can be moved around a site.

At school zones, the cameras will be in stationary school zone signs, but can also be moved as needed.

Do right thing

“Speed kills and there is no apology for enforcing speed limits in school zones and roadworks sites,” Superintendent Janelle Andrews said.

“These new speed cameras force drivers to slow down in order to avoid a fine or incur demerit points, there is no penalty for doing the right thing."

Supt Andrews said in 2021 speeding was a factor in 74 fatalities on this state’s roads, which represented 27 per cent of the total lives lost on Queensland’s roads.

New mobile cameras to catch speeding motorists

Senior Sergeant Brett Stevenson, Officer-in-Charge Moreton District Highway Patrol at Deception Bay, said there were “issues” with speeding through roadworks.

“Speed limits are there for the safety of the workers and teams,” Sen Sgt Stevenson said, “but we are always picking up motorists for speeding.”

He said driver “inattention” was also behind a number of accidents and mobile phones may have been a factor.

TMR Minister Mark Bailey said: “I don’t want to see another roadworker killed or someone’s child badly injured because of the recklessness of a speeding driver.

High-risk locations

“These cameras will pop up in high-risk locations so I am giving Queenslanders fair warning that these can be anywhere, anytime.

“It’s vital we do everything we can to keep the vulnerable in our community safe on our roads and these cameras will help to achieve that.”

Traffic Management Association of Australia (TMAA) Chief Executive Officer Louise Van Ristell said the program would provide significant data on the number of drivers who continue to disregard speed reductions.

Minister Bailey said speeding 1-10km/h over the limit will lead to a $287 fine and one demerit point. Between 11-20km/h the fine is $431 and three demerit points.

For more on road safety around schools visit tmr.qld.gov.au

Share

Related Stories

Popular Stories

Old nurses' quarters more than just a building 
News / Local

Old nurses' quarters more than just a building 

The former nurses’ quarters building at Redcliffe Hospital is a place where memories were made and friendships forged for student nurses who lived there. The building, now known as West Block, is earmarked for demolition in mid-2024. Three nurses who still work at the hospital share their memories

Fighting cancer through art
News / Local

Fighting cancer through art

Mother-of-three Rachel Bernardo will open an art exhibition in Redcliffe next month to help raise awareness of bowel cancer and funding for research. ** FREE TO READ **

Putting safety first for 35 years
News / Local

Putting safety first for 35 years

Jenny Neate has been going to Bray Park State School for 35 years – and has no plans to stop. ** FREE TO READ **