Who’s Who in 2022, Environment: Bribie Island Environmental Protection Association (BIEPA)

Published 1:30am 16 December 2022

Who’s Who in 2022, Environment: Bribie Island Environmental Protection Association (BIEPA)
Words by Moreton Daily

Bribie Island Environmental Protection Association (BIEPA) created the biggest human sculpture on Bribie to celebrate and raise awareness of the 2022 turtle nesting and hatching season.

Scores of supporters helped form a giant turtle on Woorim beach to draw attention to the natural wonder and environmental importance of Bribie.

“The idea is to show the beach supported by people aware of the importance of nesting turtles,” BIEPA President Richard Ogden said.

“It’s a really exciting time and we want to work with all levels of government - and the public - to look after and care for it.”

A Bribie resident for seven years, Mr Ogden said BIEPA needs to work closely with traditional owners and the aboriginal community, as well as “embrace” all islanders to “re-imagine” Bribie as a “leading example of environmental care and active reconciliation”.

BIEPA held a major fundraiser at Bribie Island RSL this year, along with a tree planting supported by all three levels of government.

Regular rubbish clean-ups were held and monthly public meetings, also held at Bribie RSL, have seen an increasing number of people attending.

About BIEPA: Bribie Island Environmental Protection Association (BIEPA) was formed 45 years ago when residents noticed a decline in native wildlife.

The group’s initial plans were to boost Bribie’s image as a sanctuary for fauna and the protection of native flowers.

It’s aims have been to work with development and tourism to ensure they recognises the natural environment which makes the island unique.

Bribie is protected under the United Nations Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance.

However, essential habitat for local and migratory species, protected under the UN Convention, has been lost over the years.

Sand dunes have also come under threat from rising sea levels, weather events and in some cases, vehicles driving along the beach.

One of BIEPA’s driving forces for many years was former president Diane Oxenford who retired to Bribie with husband John in 2006.

Diane’s work with turtles – both the adults who return to Bribie’s beaches each year to nest and the subsequent hatchlings - has been recognised are and wide.

Richard Ogden, a journalist by trade who ran a communications business for nine years on Brisbane’s northside, took over this year.

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